Making the Case for Youth Sexual and Reproductive Rights

In 2009, L.C., a 13-year-old girl living in Peru was raped. When she discovered she was pregnant, L.C. jumped from the roof of her house in an unsuccessful attempt to commit suicide. Due to her injuries, she needed surgery, but doctors would not perform it because she was pregnant, nor would they allow her access to a therapeutic abortion, although that would have been legal.


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United Nations Adopts Landmark Resolution on Adolescents and Youth

Mauricio Cruz Avendaño: The Future of Youth Sexual and Reproductive Rights

How can you increase the size of your penis? How many times a day can you masturbate? Can you get a sexually transmitted infection if you touch yourself?

As a health promoter in rural Oaxaca, Mexico, Mauricio Cruz Avendaño is commonly asked these types of questions. Motivated by the goal of ensuring that all young people in Oaxaca can safely and responsibly exercise their sexuality, Mauricio works to break the myths, barriers, and taboos regarding sexuality among young people.


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Mexfam's JOCCA Model Meets the Community Where It's At

Mexfam's JOCCA Model Meets the Community Where It's At

Throughout Mexico, Mexfam employs approximately 1,000 health promoters. These promoters educate community members about sexual ad reproductive health and provide a much-needed link to Mexfam’s clinical services—as well as condoms and contraception—in rural and underserved areas. As part of this work, Mexfam’s health promoters host JOCCAs—two-day local events that bring the community together for discussions and learning about sex.


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Slideshow: On the Go in Mexico

Slideshow: On the Go in Mexico

Mexfam's three-tiered approach to sexual and reproductive health—services, education and community—gives them the critical capacity to reach those most in need. In this slideshow, you will see glimpses of the organization's community work in action, including a Mexfam Volkswagen Bug used to reach vulnerable populations, a festival for Good Samaritan Day, and a health promoter in rural Oaxaca showing off her supply of condoms, contraception, and other basic medical supplies.


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Violence On the Mexico-US Border

Violence On the Mexico-US Border

To supplement our series on Mexico, we are excerpting a chapter from a newly published book, The Unfinished Revolution: Voices from the Global Fight for Women's Rights, that explains why it is crucial to understand and address the violence faced by women at the Mexico-US border:


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How do Women in Mexico Learn about Sexual and Reproductive Health?

How do Women in Mexico Learn about Sexual and Reproductive Health?

Mexico has the second largest economy in Latin America, but about 52% of the country’s total income held by the wealthiest 20% of the population, and persistent inequalities remain a major challenge to development.


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Rigoberta Sánchez León: Oaxaca's Good Samaritan

Rigoberta Sánchez León: Oaxaca's Good Samaritan

On Good Samaritan Day, we visited the tiny Oaxacan town of Ciénega de Zimatlán. We were there to meet with some of Mexfam’s volunteer health educators and visit the local health care clinic, but the real action was in the town’s zocalo (town square) where plastic tubs of creamy horchata and other delicacies were being set up for the community celebration.


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What is the Sexual and Reproductive Health Need in Oaxaca?

What is the Sexual and Reproductive Health Need in Oaxaca?

As the fifth largest state of Mexico, Oaxaca is characterized by extreme geographic fragmentation. Located where the Eastern Sierra Madre and the Southern Sierra Madre come together, Oaxaca shares a common border with the states of Veracruz and Puebla (on the north), Chiapas (on the east), and Guerrero (on the west). Oaxaca's rugged topography has played a significant role in giving rise to its amazing cultural diversity.


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A Nurse in Mexico Talks about Overcoming Barriers to Care

A Nurse in Mexico Talks about Overcoming Barriers to Care

When I was growing up in California, I often felt disconnected from my extended family in Mexico. The language barrier was enough of a challenge, but the distance I felt was also the result of the drastic differences in our everyday experiences. The obstacles I encountered as a young woman in the US felt very tied to the country in which I lived. Once I became a teenager, however, I realized our experiences weren't as different as I'd assumed in my youth, especially when it came to accessing sexual and reproductive health care.


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My Mexican Viaje del Apapachos

My Mexican Viaje del Apapachos

When you travel in a country where the language spoken is not your native tongue, you learn many words and phrases as a matter of necessity: “Please,” “thank you,” and “what time is it?” top the list. Then, there are the more interesting words and sayings—the ones you absorb through conversations and casualties.


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Why Are We Celebrating Cinco de Mayo?
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