Men in the Movement: Continuing a Legacy of Reproductive Health and Rights

In my family, being pro-choice comes naturally. This is not just because the ghost of my grandmother, Margaret Sanger, would rise from her grave to wreak vengeance on any of her relations who dare stray from the path. It is also because the guys have the model of my grandfather, William Sanger, to emulate.


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Men in the Movement: Stories of Celebration

Men in the Movement: Stories of Celebration

Men. Who needs them, right? After all, who created all these laws and strictures against sexual and reproductive rights? Men. The men in churches and the men on thrones and the men in the legislatures and courts. Saint Augustine. Saint Thomas Aquinas. Martin Luther. Anthony Comstock. All of them were men. (Let’s skip over Queen Victoria and Indira Gandhi for a moment, so that I can have my Manichean Moment.)


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Women Who Inspire Change

A Hundred Years of Struggle

In the United States, we have recently seen unprecedented attempts to undermine women’s reproductive health and rights. While Roe v. Wade remains the law of the land, in the past year, states throughout the nation enacted 92 anti-abortion provisions—the highest number ever. At the same time, anti-choice individuals have sought to restrict women’s access to basic health services that many of us take for granted, like contraception and cancer screenings.


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Should HIV+ Women be Concerned about Hormonal Contraceptives?

Tinderbox: A Tale of World Travel and HIV

How did a lone primate hunter in Cameroon spark the global AIDS epidemic? Tinderbox presents a fascinating history of colonialism and disease.

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Summer Reading Recommendations from Our Staff

Lifting the Burden on Guatemala's Isolated Communities

In the midst of a week of torrential rains, floods, and mudslides so severe that a state of emergency was declared, Dr. Zanotty and three clinical staff inch their vehicle through the countryside of Guatemala. The drive takes longer than normal as they traverse washed out bridges and carefully make their way past tipped over tractor-trailers. Despite the hazards, the team knows that a group of women will be waiting for them, waiting for sexual and reproductive health information and services.


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Championing the Power of Youth Advocacy in Guatemala

Summer Reading Recommendations from Our Staff

As the first glimpse of summer settled into New York City, we asked our staff to share their suggestions for stellar summer reading. The following eleven books encompass their replies:

1. Kingston Noir
Edited by Colin Channer

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Choice Words: An Interview with Jennifer Baumgardner on Reproductive Rights

The House is Not a Safe Space for Women

Leaving no stone unturned, women’s health opponents are working again to eliminate funding for international family planning and reproductive health programs, as well as funding to UNFPA, the global agency that supports a breadth of reproductive health services for women in extreme poverty in more than 140 countries.


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What Part do Women Play in Sustaining the World?

What Part do Women Play in Sustaining the World?

A sexual and reproductive health advocate’s work is never done.


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How Are Environment and Reproductive Health Communities Working Together for Rio+20?

A Feminist Science Perspective on the IUD

In The Global Biopolitics of the IUD science and technology professor Chikako Takeshita recounts the history of intrauterine devices (IUDs) and its impact on women throughout the world. She takes a critical look at the research on contraceptives and the politics surrounding women having control of their own bodies.


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How Did Women's Health Advocates Start a Movement?

Making the Case for Youth Sexual and Reproductive Rights

In 2009, L.C., a 13-year-old girl living in Peru was raped. When she discovered she was pregnant, L.C. jumped from the roof of her house in an unsuccessful attempt to commit suicide. Due to her injuries, she needed surgery, but doctors would not perform it because she was pregnant, nor would they allow her access to a therapeutic abortion, although that would have been legal.


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United Nations Adopts Landmark Resolution on Adolescents and Youth
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